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Accident Frequency Rate

Sarah C 8 years ago   Reply
Can anyone help me? I'm trying to work out our injury incidence rates and I would like to know if the 'Average number employed during year' is on a weekly, monthly or yearly basis. For example if our average number of employees is 60 and our reportable injuries are 5 what would the calculation be?

Thanks
Chris Wood 8 years ago   Reply
Hi Sarah,

The best way to do this is in an excel spreadsheet.
That will let you embed the formulas and then vary the number of employees and other variables each month.
Sorry I can't lay my hands on the formulas right now.

Charlie Says 8 years ago   Reply
You get a pretty accurate representation by using number of RIDDOR reportable injuries per man day worked eg. 48 weeks x 5 days per week x No. of staff (60) = 14400 days and 5 RIDDORS or for a more accurate picture you could present the RIDDORS as lost time if you know how many days employees were absent.

eg. 15 RIDDOR lost time days per 14400 days which equates to a ratio of 0.104%
Antonio 8 years ago   Reply
Sarah,

I calculate the Incidence Rate on a monthly basis, with 2 variations. The
"Incidence Rate" column is divided in 2, Monthly figure and Accumulated
figure. This way, as the months build up, I will have acurate values for
monthly and when the year comes to an end, for yearly.
In your example, I would do the following:
(5x1000)/60 = 83.33

Unless your company deals with medium to high risk works, I would say that
this value is a bit high, taking into account the number of employees (and
that it is a monthly figure).

Hope this helped. If there is anything else you need, please do not
hesitate in contacting me. My email is agquina@«hidden»

Regards,
Antonio


On 26/09/2008, Sarah C <construction-senderhidden@«hidden»>
wrote:

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Juan Carlos Arias 8 years ago   Reply
The way I work out the accident rate is: I base it on 100,000hrs (which is what anybody would approximately work in their life) this helps in explaining the figures to employees in a more friendly/ understandable manner.

you can either do it weekly, montly or whatever. the formula is

(Number of accidents x 100,000 hrs) / hrs worked. your 60 employees would work 140400 hrs in the year (45hrs per person per week) and you have 5 reportable accidents.

(5 x 100,000) / 140400 = 3.56. your reportable accident rate for the year based on 100,000 hrs worked is 3.56, which means that an employee working in your company is likely to have 3.56 reportable accidents during their life if they worked there all their life.

hope it helps
Robert Lewis 8 years ago   Reply
Sarah

You are getting into a muddle over Incidence and Frequency rates.

The Incidence Rate for HSE purposes is number of accidents per 100000 employees

ie Number of reportable injuries in financial year X 100,000/ Average number employed during year

The Frequency rate formula is

Number of accidents x 100000/No of hours worked

For the HSE the Incidence rate is much easier to use as they merely use the number of officially employed construction sector workers. For companies however the frequency rate is generally much easier to manage especially in construction where the workforce number can be highly variable. There are variations using 1000 hours but these are not universally recognised. In the US one million manhours is often used.
Bill Sowerbutts 8 years ago   Reply

RE:Health and Safety File - Your views please




Hello All

I have an issue that creates a perennial nightmare at the end of each
project. The Health and Safety File. There is so much confusion over
what this is or is supposed to be and the variations on what is
presented as information so great that I wonder if anyone knows what is
supposed to be in it. We put guidance in the pre-contract information,
but this is often ignored. New projects should add to the existing
file, but often create "stand alone" project health and safety files as
if the existing building doesn't exist.

The HSE offers guidance - states it should be brief and then in the ACoP
lists a vast array of items that would fill a Tolstoy novel. Personally
I have always felt that the O and M manual if complete should suffice
with a preface from the coordinator directing the Client into the parts
of the manual which require special attention for maintenance, fire risk
or dismantling purposes, and offering brief guidance on how this might
be achieved safely.

I cannot see any point in dismembering a perfectly well indexed O and M
manual to create another file - it just creates confusion. Lord knows
there are enough forests under threat without increasing paper use still
further by copying across the same information.

I also feel - and this is controversial - that the Health and Safety
File should not be a legal requirement on the Coordinator as he has very
little say in the suppliers of materials or the sub-contractors who fit
them. At least the Principal Contractor knows what specific product was
put in and by whom (and whether it meets safety standards. Guidance on
health and safety issues tends to be either very complex or so simple
that it is self-obvious. On the former, it often takes a technician
(e.g. on refrigeration) to decide the manner in which tasks will be done
safely, where on the latter (e.g. cleaning windows) once the design of
the window has been decided and the window is in place, it is self
obvious that work at height will be needed on a 3rd storey window, or
whether it can be cleaned from within if it is a "tilt and turn" design.
But the safety issue for either is decided by cost and Client preference
(taking into account safe access issues) at the design stage, and
doesn't need a safety file to state the obvious (the same with cleaning
gutters, drains etc).

I would dearly love HSE to publish some real examples of acceptable
files. But whenever I have ha d a contractor who has refused to supply
information, or is unable to provide it, and told the HSE, their
interest seems very nominal.

Clients often have no interest, often grateful to be in their new
structure, paying the Principal Contractor for the physical completion,
and really wondering what we are on about when we ask for the contractor
not to be paid until he has provided information. The job is over,
complete as far as everyone is concerned and yet the Coordinator is
often left with an impossible task with other members of the project
team M and E Consultants, contractors etc. simply wanting to move on.

So how do you other Coordinators out there find things - the same - or
am I the only one.


RS 8 years ago   Reply

RE:Health and Safety File - Your views please

Bill - I thought I was the only one who struggled with this every time. Like you I have failed to see the need to duplicate the O&M, so what I have recently done is to rewrite our O&M manual format to include a section entitled H&S File. In this I now put anything relevant that does not naturally go into any of the other sections. From this I then refer the reader to the respective sections if needed.
However I still have clients who are asking for just the H&S File, but I am working on them...

Rob
SANDRA LEDDY 8 years ago   Reply
Are you accident frequency rates statistics worked out on reportable accidents only or on ALL accidents in the same year.


Ian Simms 8 years ago   Reply


Sarah,


We require that the accident frequency rate will be calculated as follows:
NRA / ANE x 100,000
Where:
· NRA is the number of reportable accidents in the previous 12 months.
· the number of reportable accidents is defined as the total number of
RIDDOR accidents (as defined by the Health and Safety at Work Act), across
all the Contractorâ??s customers [including its holding company and/or
subsidiaries]; and.
· â??In the previous 12 monthsâ?? shall mean the previous 12 month period
relevant to each current month.
· ANE is the average number of employees over the previous 12 months
which shall take into account the following:
- Where subcontractors provide part of the service the number of
subcontract workers should be included.
- Head office and management staff should be included.
- The Contractor shall take a reasonable view on the use of
part-time staff and sub-contract workers when calculating the
number of employees.

Regards,

Ian Simms


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Can anyone help me? I'm trying to work out our injury incidence rates and I
would like to know if the 'Average number employed during year' is on a
weekly, monthly or yearly basis. For example if our average number of
employees is 60 and our reportable injuries are 5 what would the
calculation be?

Thanks

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Grant 8 years ago   Reply
Hi Sarah, Ian,
There seems to a common mix up between incidence and frequency rates


It is rarely possible to assess how risk is managed so we use trend analysis as a proxy measurement, this is accomplished by the calculating of two rates:

Incidence rate &
Accident frequency rate.

Incidence Rate. Give the number of accidents for 1000 employees and is used to take into account variations in the size of the workforce:

Incidence Rate = Number of Accidents X 1000
Numbers Employed

Frequency Rate. Gives the number of accidents for every 100 000 hours worked and takes into account variations in the amount of work accomplished, and allows for part time workers.

Frequency Rate = Number of accidents X 100 000
Number of hours worked

The calculation of these rates enable us to make comparisons between one organization and another.

Hope this is useful
Regards
Grant Maloney

Ian Simms 8 years ago   Reply
Grant,

Thanks for your explanation.


Ian Simms


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Sarah C 8 years ago   Reply
Thanks for all your messages.
Robert Lewis 8 years ago   Reply
Grant

Your use of 1000 instead of 100,000 confuses the issue. To understand directly the comparisons with HSE figures one should use their multiplier. Yes the use of 1,000 can improve the look of the figures but can lead to false impressions when compared to the official statistics.
Jim 7 years ago   Reply

Access to accident report book

In an educational establishment in 2000 a student on the ground was injured and required stitches in hospital, due to being stuck by an object thrown from a second floor window.

Questions:
1) Should such an incident / accident before reported and if so why ?

2) Should a lecturer being permitted to check the entry made in the Accident Report Book concerning the time and nature of the injuies sustained ?

3) Would be acceptable to state that a lecturer is 'a responsible person', as
referred to in the legislation ?


I would appreciate your comments on same.

Thanks.

JIM


kynoch 8 years ago   Reply
Please could you supply me with the formulars (riddor) for frequency rates, and incident rates.
Kind regards,
Kynoch Todd
Sameem 8 years ago   Reply

I want to know about pollution permitting or liscensin on pollution if any body have info plz share with me i will be very thank full> Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2009 13:00:27 +0000> From: construction-senderhidden@«hidden»> To: construction-moderate@«hidden»> Subject: Re:[construction] Accident Frequency Rate> > Please could you supply me with the formulars (riddor) for frequency rates, and incident rates.> Kind regards,> Kynoch Todd> > *-----------------------------------------------*> HSE Construction Forum> http://webcommunities.hse.gov.uk/ui/inovem.ti/group/construction/grouphome> Unsubscribe: construction-unsubscribe@«hidden»> ^-----------------------------------------------^
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Lesley Richards 8 years ago   Reply
How do you work out an accident rate.


Lesley
Lol Prins 8 years ago   Reply
Lesley,

May I suggest you buy a copy of Health and Safety Pocket Book by Jeremy Shranks.
It contains a plethora of Occupational Health and Safety Information including accepted accident indices. It is a brilliant reference book that I think you will find most useful and is only £19.

Lol
Bill Sowerbutts 8 years ago   Reply
Usually no of ACCIDENTS AS A PROPORTION OF MAN HOURS (OR 100 MAN HOURS
OR 1000 MAN HOURS) WHICHEVER SCALE YOU PICK

-----Original Message-----
From: Lesley Richards
[mailto:construction-senderhidden@«hidden»]
Sent: 27 February 2009 14:29
To: construction-moderate@«hidden»
Subject: Re:[construction] Accident Frequency Rate


How do you work out an accident rate.


Lesley

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